Using A Keyword (hashtag) to Follow an Event or Conversation, in this case New York Fashion Week.
Posted on 15th February 2010 by jason moriber

This is a quick post to show you one way to use Twitter to listen to or join in a conversation about a topic or an event. Currently New York Fashion Week is underway, and the people who are using Twitter to communicate about the event have chosen a "tag" or key-word to add to their messages so their tweets are findable by those who are seeking to be within the conversation.

Most tags use the "hash" also known as the "number sign "#". Either people get together to decide on a hashtag, others make them up, use them for fun, or are totally serious about them. In the case of New York Fashion Week, the hashtag is "#NYFW". If I go to Twitter.com and enter this tag into the search box I'll be presented with all the tweets that include this tag, allowing me to see specific conversations and messages relating to this event. Pretty cool stuff.

Please let me know your further questions by posting them in the comments box below. Until next time, thanks!

Comments

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From: Alex Wright , February 24th, 2010 : 03:34p.m. UTC
Hi Jason- Two questions: 1) is there a Website where one can go to look for already established hashtags associated with events, etc? How would one know that the people are already using #NYFW as the hashtag? 2) What's the difference, in terms of search and in terms of overall functionality, between hashtags and just regular words? How does "#NYFW" differ from "NYFW" (without the hashtag) in terms of search and overall functionality? I can't seem to tell. Thanks! -Alex
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From: jason moriber , February 24th, 2010 : 04:15p.m. UTC
Hey Alex! Question: 1) is there a Website where one can go to look for already established hashtags... Answer: You can go to a site such as http://hashtags.org (very bare bones) to see what is trending and to search for hashtags. As example, in the search box you can type in the whole line "new york fashion week" see what displays. BUT most events or orgs will either let the crowd determine the tag or will ask that participants use a tag. In my experience I've received both tweets and email from events asking we in the audience to use a specific tag. In one case there was a brief twitter discussion of a handful of audience members who worked together (virtually) to decide upon the tag. Question: 2) What's the difference, in terms of search and in terms of overall functionality, between hashtags and just regular words? Answer: Well, now that Twitter and Google have a social search deal (you can see tweets "live" in Google search results AND ever since Twitter integrated a better search, there isn't much difference. BUT there is software (such as hastag's feature that automatically adds hashtags into your Twitter stream) that rely on the hash-mark before the keyword to filter in the correct tweets. It matters by how you use them. For more info check out this twitter wiki: http://twitter.pbworks.com/Hashtags . let me know your further questions. thanks!
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From: Alex Wright , February 24th, 2010 : 04:30p.m. UTC
Whoa. Thanks. Got it ;-)